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Siri Devi Khandavilli  

 

Siri Devi Khandavilli
$40.00

plus shipping and handling

Please contact Lisa Sette Gallery to purchase



Excerpt from the introduction essay "Material Girls" by Marilyn Zeitlin:


At first glance, you could mistake Siri Devi Khandavilli's "Kama" sculptures for "the real thing:" bronze idols of Hindu female deities. And in many respects, not just resemblance, that is exactly what they are. Siri Devi Khandavilli models her sculptural images using traditional formulae to portray the female goddesses of the vast Hindu pantheon, a vocabulary that has endured through millennia. Further, she produces them in a traditional foundry where relationships, method, and tools have changed little since the Bronze Age.

But the works are unmistakably contemporary. Look: the female figures are poodles. Sometimes they are just poodles; more often, human figures with poodle heads. The incongruity is made plausible by the cohesiveness of the forms. They just look right. But the poodle identity places the work outside the tradition, creating tension that forms the work's edge.



Matthew Moore: And the Land Grew Quiet  

 

Matthew Moore: And the Land Grew Quiet
$25.00

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Please contact Lisa Sette Gallery to purchase


Catalogue to accompany the 2012 Phoenix Art Musem exhibition, "And the Land Grew Quiet: New Work by Matthew Moore."

An Arizona-based artist and farmer, Matthew Moore (b. 1976) is the last of four generations to farm his family’s land. Through his art, using the legacy and scale of Land Art, Moore explores the loss of farmland to urban growth in the metropolitan Phoenix area, as well as contemporary consumers’ alienation from the basic principles of agriculture. And the Land Grew Quiet: New Work by Matthew Moore represents an innovative and new direction in Moore’s work, contrasting the cycles of development and speculation in our own time with those of the Great Depression by mixing technology and nature as well as fiction and history. It is conceived as a single project that maps urban growth on the land and nature’s resistance to the man-made within the sublime context of the harsh but awe-inspiring landscape and climate of central Arizona.



Rebecca Campbell and Angela Ellsworth: Seeing is Believing  

 

Rebecca Campbell and Angela Ellsworth: Seeing is Believing
$20.00

plus shipping and handling

Please contact Lisa Sette Gallery to purchase

Catalogue accompanying the 2011 Phoenix Art Museum exhibition: "Rebecca Campbell and Angela Ellsworth: Seeing is Believing"

Rebecca Campbell and Angela Ellsworth both spent their childhoods in Utah and within the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Their different experiences and individual reactions to this specific context have inspired much of their mature work as artists. Multilayered and complex, their works touch on memory and nostalgia but are grounded in the present and the reinterpretation of their experiences as well as Mormon traditions and practices. This exhibition will include painting, sculpture and installations.

Rebecca Campbell (b. 1970) is known for her startling figurative paintings of children and individuals but her 2009 solo show Poltergeist included a number of large scale installations that directly drew on her childhood. She received her BFA in 1994 from the Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland, Oregon, and her MFA in painting from UCLA in 2001. She lives and works in Los Angeles.

Angela Ellsworth (b. 1964) is an interdisciplinary artist who created compelling objects and performances. The 2010 Biennale of Sydney included the installation - Seer Bonnets: A Continuing Offense, nine bonnets pierced through with pearl-tipped corsage pins and representing the nine wives of her great-great-grandfather, who was the fifth prophet of the Mormon Church. She lives and works in Phoenix.

Catalogue reverses to reveal two different front covers (pictured) in which both artists are jointly represented.



Jessica Joslin: Strange Nature  

 

Jessica Joslin: Strange Nature | Buy Now
$75.00

Hardbound. 152 pp., 140 full-color plates. Publication date: April 2008

 

Excerpt from the introduction essay "Myth and Magic: An Introduction to the Work of Jessica Joslin" by Kathleen Vanesian:

Within the phantasmagorical sculptural world of Jessica Joslin, a rose is not a rose, despite poetic assertions of Lost Generation writer Gertrude Stein to the contrary. It may look like a rose, perhaps even feel and smell like a rose, but chances are excellent that, in Joslin's universe, any such floral form would be composed of a variety of puzzle-like parts that have little to do with the traditional worlds of botany or flora.

The artfully imagined skeletal macrocosm that sculptor Jessica Joslin has constructed over the past 16 years teems with elusive three-dimensional mammalian, avian and insect forms. Many of these animals are articulated and movable. They are all painstakingly created from a complex assortment of disparate objects that Joslin has collected from the worlds of nature and of man. The artist baptizes each of her intricately fabricated offspring with whimsical, often mythological, names, including some directly appropriated from her own family's genealogical chart. Not surprisingly, Joslin collects names as obsessively as she does that other detritus and artifacts that fill the small Chicago studio space she has shared with her husband, mentor and sounding board, painter Jared Joslin, for the last fifteen years.

Animal skulls, bird and fish bones, feathers plucked from another millennium's millinery masterpieces, orphaned electric and gas lamps, once fashionable furs harvested from what the artist terms grandma collars, antique silverware, jewelry findings, arcane industrial hardware, Oddfellow ritual regalia, glass eyes -- these and many more esoteric items are cannibalized, recycled and reconfigured by the artist into her unearthly menagerie of preternatural specimens. With consummate craftsmanship, Joslin reaches into this wildly diverse bag of ingredients to magically conjure eerily life-like skeletal sculptures, highly evocative of real members of the animalia kingdom, which she often places within theatrical or historical contexts - all with a wry gothic edge.